Whiteness 101: Equipping Pastors to Work for Racial Justice Webinar


For the most part, the white church has lived in a racially insular social environment. This environment creates expectations for racial comfort while at the same time lowering the stamina of white people to endure racial stress. Robin DiAngelo terms this lack of racial stamina as “White Fragility.”

White Fragility is a state in which even a minimal challenge to one’s racial comfort becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive responses. Yet this moment asks us all to deeply listen. The deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd and Breonna Taylor and the social call for change is something that the church must not only understand but be instrumental in leading faithfully. But how do white pastors leading predominantly white congregations do this in our present context?  What are the dynamics, theologically and socially, of living as white followers of Jesus in a racially diverse culture? 

Texas Annual Conference hosted a free three-part webinar series, “Whiteness 101: Equipping Pastors to Work for Racial Justice,” to provide the perspectives and skills needed for white clergy to build their racial stamina and lead their congregations in this area.
 

The sessions were led by Bishop Scott J. Jones in collaboration with the Project Curate Team under the leadership of Rev. Matt Russell, Associate Pastor of Chapelwood UMC Houston, and Rachel Schneider, MA, PhD, Co-Managing Director. To learn more about Project Curate, visit https://www.projectcurate.org/.

  • Session 1: Intro to white privilege, white fragility, racism and systemic racism.

 

  • Session 2: A deeper look into why white people don’t pay attention to the privilege they experience daily. 

 

  • Coming Soon: August 20 from 2-3:30 p.m. CDT - Session 3: Equipping pastors with practical tools for leading congregations and creating space to discuss these issues and take a boldly anti-racist stance. This final session will include time for breakout conversations based on the ministry context.