"Come and See About Me"


By: Rev. Tori C. Butler,  Wiley College Chaplain
In 1964, the Supremes had a popular song “Come See About Me. ” It is a love song about a lost love. It is asking the man to just come back and see about the love that he walked away from. Diana Ross’ voice invites the listener into her pain and into her loneliness. She is crying for her man to “Come See About Me, Baby.” In today’s society, we want people to do the same. We want people to come and see about us. We want people to visit us. We want people to see our value. In a day and age where we follow Facebook posts, pictures on Instagram, and tweets- the urge to come and physically see has been lost. Yet, the need for intimacy with others is still present. Despite, our cyber connectedness we still want people to come and see about us.
As a pastor that was recruited from the east coast, I cannot tell you how I value when family, friends, and colleagues take time out of their schedules to come and see about me. It reminds me not only that someone cares; but, that I am not forgotten. It reminds me that I am not invisible. It lets me know that I am worth coming to see about.
Myself along with the rest of the Texas Annual Conference Missionaries to Kenya had the opportunity to show the same sentiment. We were able to show different groups of orphans that they were worthy for someone to travel across the ocean to come and see about them. You see when young people become orphans in Kenya due to illness or death of a parent, no one comes to see about them. They become invisible. They become outcasts. They have no family. They have no community. However, when they become a part of Zoe Ministry, these children are orphans no more, because now they are a part of a large family and a large community. Zoe Ministry provides working groups, that function as large families. And an essential part of participating in the group is that they come and see one another. They remind each other that they are not alone. And most importantly they are a physical manifestation of hope. The hope that God has not left them, yet!
As believers in Jesus Christ, we are beckoned to come and see one another. In Matthew’s gospel Jesus explains that the kingdom of God will be offered to those who remembered him in his time of need. Jesus says, “For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me” (Matthew 25:34-36).  God is calling us to see about those in our communities that have become invisible: the elderly who are no longer able to come to church, those with cognitive disabilities who may not be able to communicate God’s love verbally, the single mother that is overwhelmed, the recovering addict who has lost all faith in God and the church, our un-housed neighbors whom we at times avert our eyes because we do not know what to do or to say, those who are in prison, our college students who once go away to school become out of sight and out of mind- God has called all of us to come and see about them.  When we come and see about one another, we are coming and seeing Jesus.  We are showing the love of God through our sheer bodily presence. When we come and see, we are demonstrating that the grace of God is available to all and not to just some. So my, brothers and sisters for all those who for some reason cannot ask you, I ask you today, “Come and see about me!”